Failfix dolls spark outrage as social media users describe them as giving a ‘hideous message’πŸ’₯πŸ‘©πŸ’₯πŸ’₯πŸ‘©πŸ’₯

Dolls that let children as young as six ‘fix’ their ‘fail face’ spark outrage as critics say they’re offering a ‘hideous message’ to youngsters

  • Failfix dolls let children rid them of old, smudged makeup and ‘fix’ their faces
  • Parents have taken to Twitter to reveal their outrage at the dolls’ messaging
  • The toys were labelled ‘hideous’ by people who think they’re harmful for girls
  • However, the brand has always denied that messaging is harmful, saying: ‘A failed makeover is not a failed person’


The makers of a doll aimed at children as young as six have come under fire from social media users – because the toy asks youngsters to fix a face of ‘failed’ makeup.

The Failfix dolls, which are available online at Amazon and in-store at shops such as Smyths, Hamleys, the Entertainer and Tesco, are being criticised by onlookers who claim the toys could be sending a harmful message to young girls.

The toy’s premise is to get children to ‘fix’ a doll’s smudged makeup and get them ready for the day with quotes included in the packaging exclaiming: ‘Nuh-uh, I can’t be seen like this’ and ‘My cutie buns are botched and my make-up is a flop’.

FailFix dolls, by the Australian company Moose toys, have come under fire after parents voiced their concerns over Twitter

The dolls have raised questions over whether focusing on makeup is sending the right message

The dolls have raised questions over whether focusing on makeup is sending the right message

A pampering face mask is applied to the doll which removes the unruly makeup.

Chief executive at gender equality organisation the Fawcett Society, Felicia Willow, told The Sunday Times: ‘It’s disappointing that sexist stereotypes persist.

‘It’s about time toy manufacturers and retailers woke up and dragged themselves out of the dark ages.’

A spokesperson for Australian company Moose toys, which makes the dolls, has previously denied that the toys suggest beauty and failure are linked, saying earlier this year: ‘Moose Toys most certainly do not create toys with a view to discriminate against or stereotype anyone.

‘FailFix is all about the transformation of a failed makeover not a failed person.’

The dolls 'get ready' when the children places a pampering spa mask on the dolls' faces and then remove it to reveal a freshly made up look

The dolls ‘get ready’ when the children places a pampering spa mask on the dolls’ faces and then remove it to reveal a freshly made up look

In April, parents raged against the brand. One person wrote, ‘Hideous message that these are giving to our little girls (not that boys aren’t paying attention either, just that girls are obviously the primary target!) ‘Hey girls, if you don’t try hard enough, you’re failing to be pretty!”

Another agreed saying, ‘Well that’s something I can’t unsee. Who the hell thought that was an ok idea? And how many focus groups did it get through?!’

A third person wrote, ‘For goodness sake, and what makes you even sadder is that there are people, especially mothers, that will buy this c**p. I wonder if any women were complicit in the terrible design of this…so disappointing.’

Another parents voiced their dislike saying: ‘Just horrendous! Fortunately my kids didn’t get into playing with dolls at all never mind ones like this. There really should be some sort of monitoring going on- who comes up with the pitch for these?!’

A few others, however, saw a more innocent side to the dolls’ messaging.

One person wrote, ‘No the dolls had a bad makeup day and need help fixing it. the ‘fail faces’ are not ugly, just flustered, upset and silly ‘eek i messed up my makeup how am i going to make it to the party! someone help!!’ faces Message?: It’s okay to mess up + ask for help; always brush your hair’

Meanwhile another person said, ‘It’s fixing a bad makeup day. You help the characters get ready in the morning. What’s the issue.’

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Failfix dolls spark outrage as social media users describe them as giving a ‘hideous message’

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